Occurrence

Mammal assemblages recorded by camera traps inside and outside the evacuation zone of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Latest version published by National Institute of Genetics, ROIS on 16 May 2022 National Institute of Genetics, ROIS
In 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident resulted in the evacuation of about 81,000 people from the evacuation zone, which suffered from high levels of radioactive contamination. Large-scale and long-term land abandonment can cause changes in species assemblages. Despite the extensive global attention this incident received, open and spatially-explicit datasets of mammal fauna from Fukushima remain quite limited. We established a continuous monitoring protocol using camera traps for mammals both inside and outside the evacuation zone; this paper presents the dataset. These data represent the monitoring results from 45 camera traps from May 2014 to May 2016, including the location and actuation time of each camera, and the list of video records. After the publication of this init... More
Publication date:
16 May 2022
License:
CC-BY 4.0

Description

In 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident resulted in the evacuation of about 81,000 people from the evacuation zone, which suffered from high levels of radioactive contamination. Large-scale and long-term land abandonment can cause changes in species assemblages. Despite the extensive global attention this incident received, open and spatially-explicit datasets of mammal fauna from Fukushima remain quite limited. We established a continuous monitoring protocol using camera traps for mammals both inside and outside the evacuation zone; this paper presents the dataset. These data represent the monitoring results from 45 camera traps from May 2014 to May 2016, including the location and actuation time of each camera, and the list of video records. After the publication of this initial data paper, we intend to continue monitoring until 2023 and the dataset will be hereafter updated with new observations.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 6,860 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

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Data as a DwC-A file download 6,860 records in English (126 kB) - Update frequency: annually
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Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Fukasawa K., Mishima Y., Yoshioka A., Kumada N., Totsu K., Osawa T.(2016) Mammal assemblages recorded by camera traps inside and outside the evacuation zone of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Ecological Research 31(4), 493. doi:10.1007/s11284-016-1366-7

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is National Institute of Genetics, ROIS. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 60807e2a-422e-48a4-b79d-eeb35820a8bb.  National Institute of Genetics, ROIS publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF Japan.

Keywords

Occurrence; Observation; forest; Satoyama; depopulation; carnivore; herbivore; Japan; Occurrence

Contacts

Who created the resource:

NIES Fukushima Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring Team
Researcher
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP

Who can answer questions about the resource:

NIES Fukushima Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring Team
Researcher
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
Biodiversity Division
National Institute for Environmental Studies

Who filled in the metadata:

NIES Fukushima Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring Team
Researcher
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP

Who else was associated with the resource:

Author
Keita Fukasawa
Researcher
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
+8129-850-2676
Author
Yoshio Mishima
Junior Research Associate
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
Author
Akira Yoshioka
Researcher
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
Author
Nao Kumada
Research Assistant
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
Author
Kumiko Totsu
Specialist (Database engineer)
National Institute for Environmental Studies
16-2 Onogawa
305-8506 Tsukuba
Ibaraki
JP
+8129-850-2894
Author
Takeshi Osawa
Researcher
National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences
JP

Geographic Coverage

Fukushima, Japan

Bounding Coordinates South West [37.037, 140.556], North East [37.793, 140.968]

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2014-05-15 / 2016-05-21

Sampling Methods

A trail camera (Trophycam HD, Bushnell Outdoor Products) is installed at each monitoring site during May to August 2014. Cameras were adjusted to video mode, recording for 30 seconds with 10-second or more trigger interval. The image resolution was 1280×720 pixels (720p) and the frame rate was 30 fps in daytime mode (visible light imaging) and 18 fps in night-vision mode (infrared monochrome imaging). Cameras were fixed to tree trunks at a height of about 1 m. Data collection and battery exchange have been conducted biannually. In 2014, the data collection and battery exchange were conducted in October and partially in July. Mammals that appeared in the videos were identified and recorded to the event list. The duration between battery exchanges was defined as the “occasion”, and the start and end times of each occasion for each camera were recorded. The occasion values provide information on the durations for which the camera traps were active, and make it possible to calculate records per unit time. An occasion end time was defined as the time when the last video file was recorded, if a camera was inactive due to battery exhaustion or mechanical failure at the visit. The sensor cameras used in this study are essentially suitable tools for monitoring medium to large sized mammals (O'Brien et al. 2011). The capture efficiency of small mammals (e.g. rodents and shrews), can be highly sensitive to small variations in the installation of cameras, and we do not recommend treating the data on small mammals belonging to the orders Rodentia, Soricomorpha and Chiroptera as correlative indices of abundance.

Study Extent The study area is the eastern part of Fukushima prefecture, located in northeastern Japan, and is enclosed within the following four sets of coordinates: (37.79275°N, 140.55635°E), (37.79275°N, 140.96821°E), (37.03656°N, 140.96821°E), and (37.03656°N, 140.55635°E) (Fig. 1). The study area contains the evacuation zone, which has been categorized since October 2013 into three subzones: a zone in preparation for the lifting of the evacuation order (≤20 mSv/year, Zone 1), a restricted residence area (20-50 mSv/year, Zone 2), and a difficult-to-return-to zone (>50 mSv/year, after 5 years, the air dose rate will still be >20 mSv/year, Zone 3). We set 46 monitoring sites inside and outside the evacuation zone (5 sites in Zone 1, 7 sites in Zone 2, and 13 sites in Zone 3). All the monitoring sites are located in closed forest.
Quality Control All species were identified by the authors or by research collaborators who are mammal experts. If we could not obtain sufficient information for species identification from a video image, we recorded a higher taxonomic level (e.g. order and class) which could be certainly specified. Scientific names followed Ohdachi et al. (Ohdachi et al. 2009) and the Catalogue of Life (http://www.catalogueoflife.org/). Since the camera traps were set at the same location, uncertainties of geographical coordinates were estimated to be smaller than 10m in which species could be recorded and identified.

Method step description:

  1. The R (R Core Team 2014) function for tabulating number of events and duration of camera in action by arbitrary intervals is available at Github (https://github.com/ecomoni-fukushima/Conversion-tools-for-camera-trapping-data-in-R).

Bibliographic Citations

  1. O'Brien T, Kinnaird MF, Wibisono HT (2011) Estimation of species richness of large vertebrates using camera traps: an example from an Indonesian rainforest. In: AF O'Connell, JD Nichols, KU Karanth (eds) Camera traps in animal ecology: methods and analyses. Springer, pp. 233-252
  2. Ohdachi SD, Ishibashi Y, Iwasa MA, Saito T (2009) The wild mammals of Japan. Shoukadoh Book Sellers, Kyoto
  3. R Core Team (2014) R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL: http://www.R-project.org/ (latest access: Aug. 13 2015)

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers 60807e2a-422e-48a4-b79d-eeb35820a8bb
10.1007/s11284-016-1366-7
https://www.gbif.jp/ipt/resource?r=nies_mafu